Disclaimer

  1. These are excerpts taken from State Statutes and other sources. Information herein should not be assumed accurate, and if you find yourself needing accurate information about law, you are hereby advised to consult a lawyer. Information herein should be used for informational, and not legal, purposes only.
  2. Any Device listed below as “legal to carry” only applies if carried with legal intent (that is for self defense).  Most often states that allow citizens to carry weapons and devices for self defense have increased penalties for using them in commission of a crime.

Indiana’s Expanded Self Defense Law

You can use deadly force, with no duty to retreat, if you reasonably believe that deadly force is necessary to prevent serious bodily injury to yourself or another or to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. Deadly force, with no duty to retreat, is also allowed to prevent unlawful entry of your home, property or occupied vehicle or to prevent the hijacking of a plane or while attempting to take control of a plane that has been hijacked and is in flight. You can also use deadly force, with no duty to retreat, to prevent trespass or criminal interference with property that legally belongs to your immediate family or property you have the authority to protect.
or substantial physical injury.

Duty to Retreat: No

Where the Law Applies: In your home, on your property, in an occupied motor vehicle, on an airplane during a hijacking, on property owned by your immediate family or any other property you have a legal right to protect.

Indiana’s Allowance of Self Defense Devices

  • Pepper Spray – Yes
  • Stun Guns and Tasers – Yes
  • Batons – Yes
  • Nunchucks – Yes
  • Brass Knuckles – Yes
  • Sling Shots – Yes
  • Knives (All types) – Restricted (see below) -
  • Throwing Stars and Knives – No
  • Switchblades / Gravity Knife – No
  • Blowguns – Yes
  • Swords – Unknown
  • Cane Swords- Unknown

Indiana’s Concealed Carry Law

Indiana is a Shall Carry Sate: A Shall-Issue jurisdiction is one that requires a permit to carry a concealed handgun, but where the granting of such permits is subject only to meeting certain criteria laid out in the law; the granting authority has no discretion in the awarding of the permits. Such laws typically state that a granting authority shall issue a permit if the criteria are met, as opposed to laws in which the authority may issue a permit at their discretion.

Other Information

How Hard Can You Hit?

  • IC 35-41-3-2
    Sec. 2.
    (a) A person is justified in using reasonable force against another person to protect himself or a third person from what he reasonably believes to be the imminent use of unlawful force. However, a person is justified in using deadly force only if he reasonably believes that that force is necessary to prevent serious bodily injury to himself or a third person or the commission of a forcible felony. No person in this state shall be placed in legal jeopardy of any kind whatsoever for protecting himself or his family by reasonable means necessary.
    (b) A person is justified in using reasonable force, including deadly force, against another person if he reasonably believes that the force is necessary to prevent or terminate the other person’s unlawful entry of or attack on his dwelling or curtilage.
    (c) With respect to property other than a dwelling or curtilage, a person is justified in using reasonable force against another person if he reasonably believes that the force is necessary to immediately prevent or terminate the other person’s trespass on or criminal interference with property lawfully in his possession, lawfully in possession of a member of his immediate family, or belonging to a person whose property he has authority to protect. However, a person is not justified in using deadly force unless that force is justified under subsection (a) of this section.
    (d) Notwithstanding subsections (a), (b), and (c) of this section, a person is not justified in using force if:
    (1) he is committing, or is escaping after the commission of, a crime;
    (2) he provokes unlawful action by another person, with intent to cause bodily injury to the other person; or
    (3) he has entered into combat with another person or is the initial aggressor, unless he withdraws from the encounter and communicates to the other person his intent to do so and the other person nevertheless continues or threatens to continue unlawful action.
  • IC 35-41-3-3
    Sec. 3.
    (a) A person other than a law enforcement officer is justified in using reasonable force against another person to effect an arrest or prevent the other person’s escape if:
    (1) a felony has been committed; and
    (2) there is probable cause to believe the other person committed that felony.
    However, such a person is not justified in using deadly force unless that force is justified under section 2 of this chapter.
    (b) A law enforcement officer is justified in using reasonable force if the officer reasonably believes that the force is necessary to effect a lawful arrest. However, an officer is justified in using deadly force only if the officer:
    (1) has probable cause to believe that that deadly force is necessary:
    (A) to prevent the commission of a forcible felony; or
    (B) to effect an arrest of a person who the officer has probable cause to believe poses a threat of serious bodily injury to the officer or a third person; and
    (2) has given a warning, if feasible, to the person against whom the deadly force is to be used.
    (c) A law enforcement officer making an arrest under an invalid warrant is justified in using force as if the warrant was valid, unless the officer knows that the warrant is invalid.
    (d) A law enforcement officer who has an arrested person in custody is justified in using the same force to prevent the escape of the arrested person from custody that the officer would be justified in using if the officer was arresting that person. However, an officer is justified in using deadly force only if the officer:
    (1) has probable cause to believe that deadly force is necessary to prevent the escape from custody of a person who the officer has probable cause to believe poses a threat of serious bodily injury to the officer or a third person; and
    (2) has given a warning, if feasible, to the person against whom the deadly force is to be used.
    (e) A guard or other official in a penal facility or a law enforcement officer is justified in using reasonable force, including deadly force, if the officer has probable cause to believe that the force is necessary to prevent the escape of a person who is detained in the penal facility.
    (f) Notwithstanding subsection (b), (d), or (e), a law enforcement officer who is a defendant in a criminal prosecution has the same right as a person who is not a law enforcement officer to assert self-defense under IC 35-41-3-2.
  • IC 35-47-8-1
    Sec. 1. As used in this chapter, “electronic stun weapon” means any mechanism that is:
    (1) designed to emit an electronic, magnetic, or other type of charge that exceeds the equivalency of a five (5) milliamp sixty (60) hertz shock; and
    (2) used for the purpose of temporarily incapacitating a person.
  • IC 35-47-8-2
    Sec. 2. As used in this chapter, “stun gun” means any mechanism that is:
    (1) designed to emit an electronic, magnetic, or other type of charge that equals or does not exceed the equivalency of a five (5) milliamp sixty (60) hertz shock; and
    (2) used for the purpose of temporarily incapacitating a person.
  • IC 35-47-8-3
    Sec. 3. As used in this chapter, “taser” means any mechanism that is:
    (1) designed to emit an electronic, magnetic, or other type of charge or shock through the use of a projectile; and
    (2) used for the purpose of temporarily incapacitating a person.
  • IC 35-47-8-5
    Sec. 5.
    (a) A person eighteen (18) years of age or over may purchase or possess a stun gun.
    (b) A person who sells or furnishes a stun gun to a person who is less than eighteen (18) years of age commits a Class B misdemeanor.
    (c) A person who uses a stun gun in the commission of a crime commits a Class A misdemeanor.
    (d) A person who uses a stun gun on a law enforcement officer while the officer is performing the officer’s duties commits a Class D felony.

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